Signs Of A Stroke

Did you know that about 795,000 Americans have a stroke each year? Last month, WebMD published the results of a study done by Dr. Heidi Mochari-Greenberger (who works at the cardiology department at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City). In the study, they assessed 1200 women about their understanding of a stroke’s warning signs.Mochari-Greenberger said that the results suggested that “efforts to improve stroke warning sign recognition in women has the potential to reduce treatment delays and improve outcomes in women.”

So let’s do our best to remedy this, shall we?

“What exactly IS a stroke?”

Some people call them “brain attacks” because strokes occur when blood flow to your brain is disturbed somehow. When that happens, your brain cells aren’t able to get the oxygen and nutrients that it needs and they start to die off.

There are two main types of strokes. Ischemic strokes are caused when a blood clot plugs up the blood vessel or artery that leads up to the brain. Hemorrhagic strokes are caused when a blood vessel that leads up to your brain breaks and you begin to bleed into your brain.

“What are the signs of a stroke?”

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NIH) states that the signs of a stroke are distinct because they happen so fast. So if you have sudden:

  • Numbness or weakness in your face, arm, or leg on one side of your body
  • Confusion, trouble speaking or understanding what people are saying
  • Trouble seeing
  • Trouble walking or loss of balance
  • Dizziness
  • Headache

Stroke.org states that women have some unique stroke symptoms which may include sudden:

  • Face and limb pain
  • Hiccups
  • Nausea
  • Weakness in general
  • Chest pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Palpitations

“So what should I do if someone is having a stroke?”

Call 911 immediately. The faster that you see the signs, the faster he or she can get help, which will limit the amount of time that the brain is without oxygen. When a person’s brain is oxygen deprived, brain damage is eminent.

 

Image by OpenClips (http://pixabay.com/en/epilepsy-seizure-stroke-apoplexia-156105/)

 

J. Bernardo

"Joy Bernardo – writer, student for life, daughter, friend, artist, nerd, movie lover, avid coffee drinker, obsessive reader, and girl. Her list of accomplishments include receiving her college degree, following her passion, finding love, and finding her purpose in life. You can find out more about her at joybernardo.com".